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Suaimhneas celebrates 10th anniversary with Sunflower Day plant sale

Thursday, 6th June, 2019 9:33am
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Suaimhneas celebrates 10th anniversary with Sunflower Day plant sale

Pictured in support of the Sunflower Day Bloom plant sale at Suaimhneas this Friday are Judy Starr, Dick Gough, Noreen Walsh, Kay O’Donoghue (North Tipperary Hospice) and Betty Gough. The Suaimhneas Cancer Support Centre is located opposite the hurling field at Clonaslee, Gortlandroe, Nenagh.

Suaimhneas celebrates 10th anniversary with Sunflower Day plant sale

Pictured in support of the Sunflower Day Bloom plant sale at Suaimhneas this Friday are Judy Starr, Dick Gough, Noreen Walsh, Kay O’Donoghue (North Tipperary Hospice) and Betty Gough. The Suaimhneas Cancer Support Centre is located opposite the hurling field at Clonaslee, Gortlandroe, Nenagh.

A helping hand to all affected by cancer, including families and carers, Suaimhneas in Nenagh is celebrating its 10th anniversary with a 'Bloom' plant sale for Sunflower Day this Friday, June 7th.


The event will run from 8.30am to 3pm and it will include a cake sale as well as the sale of plants and vegetables from people who have used the Suaimhneas services over the years. There will also be raffle prizes on the day, with all proceeds going to continue the vital services provided locally by the fantastic team of volunteers at the Nenagh centre.  


Extending a warm welcome to all, Anne Gleeson, Director of Services at Suaimhneas, wanted to emphasise the place of solace that this centre has become to so many people, despite the darkness of cancer.


“As we celebrate our 10th year providing services in Nenagh, and our seventh year of supporting Sunflower Day with our Bloom plant sale, I would like to acknowledge and thank our hardworking garden group,” she said. “The continued success of this day is attributed to the dedication and passion that is put into it by the group.
“There is a very dedicated and passionate team in the centre who freely give of their time and energy. It is through this that creates a warm, friendly and safe environment. We need to acknowledge this and thank all the staff in Suaimhneas Cancer Support Centre.


“We also recognise a hardworking and dedicated committee, who also give freely of their time to fundraise for the services of North Tipperary Hospice Movement, which includes Suaimhneas Cancer Support Centre. We are grateful to the public, who are out there fundraising and donating much-needed funds so we can continue to deliver these services.”


Located at No 2 Clonaslee, Gortlandroe, Nenagh – just opposite MacDonagh Park GAA grounds – the Suamihneas Cancer Support Centre is a holistic centre of wellbeing. 'Suaimhneas' is an old Irish word for peace and tranquility. At the Nenagh centre, a 'helping hand' is extended to all those affected by cancer, including those living with cancer, their families, carers and friends. It is also there for those who have suffered loss due to cancer. The centre provides emotional support and practical help from a team that includes a professional counsellor, complementary therapist facilitators, and trained, dedicated volunteers in a confidential and safe environment.


As Ms Gleeson pointed out: “The word 'cancer' for most people brings a unique sense of dread and foreboding, and has a more devastating effect than most other diagnoses. The moment someone is told they have cancer is a moment of deep distress. Most people say they have never faced a bigger and more daunting challenge, and they feel almost paralysed mentally by the news.


“Coping with feelings of shock, fear, anger, disbelief and denial can make it difficult for anyone to talk about their cancer. They can withdraw and not communicate with family or friends.


“They can feel guilty and blame themselves. They can also feel unsure, afraid and worried about how friends and family react to what's ahead regarding treatment. Being judged by people is a common fear. Mostly, people feel as if they have little or no control. The norm they once knew has suddenly become a new norm.

“This is where services provided by Suaimhneas Cancer Support Centre can help people to cope by empowering them with hope, dignity and strength to journey with cancer. We endeavour to create a warm, welcoming, safe, non-judgemental and confidential environment. We facilitate the freedom of the individual to express their emotions so they can come to an acceptance of their situation.”


Statistics from the Irish Cancer Society show that one in three of our population will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime and by 2020 this will increase to one in two. But Ms Gleeson said we must also look at the other side of these statistics and see that we have more people surviving cancer. This is mainly due to screening, which leads to early diagnosis.


Overall management of cancer has vastly improved. “Serious illness may threaten a life, but it does not rob that life of meaning,” Ms Gleeson said.
To find out more about the range of free services offered, visit the Suaimhneas Cancer Support Centre Facebook page. You can also get in contact by emailing      suaimhneascancersupport@eircom.net or phoning (067) 37403.

 

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